FAILURE:  The Wednesday Word #WednesdayWisdom

FAILURE:  The Wednesday Word #WednesdayWisdom WORD:  Failure (noun) DEFINITION: lack of success. an unsuccessful person, enterprise, or thing. the omission of expected or required action. the action or state of not functioning. ETYMOLOGY: c. 1200, “be unsuccessful in accomplishing a purpose;” also “cease to exist or to function, come to an end;”  early 13c. as Read More …

CHAMPION: The Wednesday Word #WednesdayWisdom

CHAMPION: The Wednesday Word #WednesdayWisdom WORD:  Champion ( noun  ) This week is Champion.  The Wednesday Word is Champion.  It’s a noun.  Meaning person, place or thing.  In that context, it’s a person.  Who would be a good example? Michael Jordan?  Kobe?  Gretzky?  Ali?  Tiger?  Neil Armstrong? DEFINITION of Champion: a person who has defeated Read More …

BELIEF: The Wednesday Word #WednesdayWisdom

BELIEF: The Wednesday Word #WednesdayWisdom WORD: Belief (noun) DEFINITION: an acceptance that a statement is true or that something exists. something one accepts as true or real; a firmly held opinion or conviction. a religious conviction. trust, faith, or confidence in someone or something. any cognitive content held as true a vague idea in which Read More …

PROCESS: The Wednesday Word #WednesdayWisdom

  PROCESS: The Wednesday Word (the noun) DEFINITION: a systematic series of actions directed to some end: a continuous action, operation, or series of changes taking place in a definite manner:   ETYMOLOGY:   early 14c., “fact of being carried on” (as in in process), from Old French proces “a journey; continuation, development; legal trial” (13c.) Read More …

ADVERSITY: The Wednesday Word #WednesdayWisdom

ADVERSITY: The Wednesday Word #WednesdayWisdom This week’s Wednesday Word, Adversity is a noun. ADVERSITY DEFINITION: : difficulties; misfortune; as in “resilience in the face of adversity”: a state or instance of serious or continued difficulty or misfortune ADVERSITY ETYMOLOGY: Middle English: from Old French adversite, from Latin adversitas, from advertere ‘turn towards’. FROM Vacabulary.com:  “When circumstances Read More …